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Student Learning Outcomes

 Department's Student Learning Outcomes

1. Students read primary sources in philosophy and understand main arguments.
2. Students compare and contrast the core of a philosophical problem, issue, or question by referencing the inquiry to a system (history, topic, philosophers, etc.).
3. Students defend a philosophical position, view, or theory from more than one perspective.
4. Students develop and defend student's own philosophical point of view.
5. Students demonstrate a basic understanding of methods of philosophy (relevant to each of the courses offered at Cerritos College). 
7. Students identify/recognize consistencies and inconsistencies of specific philosophical theories or worldviews.

 

 

Student Learning Outcomes by Course

 

PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy

1. Students explain Socrates' statement, "The unexamined life is not worth living," by applying the statement in at least two of the following areas: epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics. 
2. Students demonstrate basic understanding to some aspects of the branches of philosophy: a) epistemology, (coherence, relevance, truth, sources, and limits of knowledge), metaphysics (the nature of reality, self, and freedom), and value theory (ethical theories and aesthetic and philosophy of art theories) 
3. Students demonstrate an enhanced ability to articulate ideas about philosophical issues. 
4. Students demonstrate a basic understanding of the methods of philosophy. 
5. Students evaluate philosophical methods, assumptions, and principles to analyze philosophical ideas and positions including but not exclusive to contemporary problems and issues. 
6. Students explain and evaluate philosophical arguments, methods, assumptions, and principles for epistemology, metaphysics, ethics, and aesthetics. 

 

PHIL 102 - Introduction to Ethics

1. Students explain and appreciate what moral philosophy is and apply at least two moral theories to issues in selected areas such as business, economics, the environment, health, personal responsibility, and politics, among many other applied ethics topics. 
2. Students define major moral theories in the Western and non-Western traditions. 
3. Students explain philosophical arguments, methods, fundamental assumptions, and principles in ethical theory including Deontology, Utilitarianism, Virtue Ethics, Ethical Relativism, Ethical Subjectivism, and Ethical Egoism. 
4. Students apply knowledge of major ethical theories to moral problems. 
5. Students compare and contrast competing ethical theories and subject them to critical analysis. 

 

PHIL 103 - Philosophical Reasoning: Critical Thinking in Philosophy

1. Students demonstrate an understanding of and appreciation for what philosophical reasoning is by identifying the elements of philosophical arguments and counterarguments, learning how to read primary philosophical texts carefully and critically, completing basic research on topics of philosophy, and writing essays on subject matter relevant to philosophy using style manuals such as the University of Chicago, American Psychological Association (APA) or Modern Language Association (MLA) styles. 
2. Students recognize the difference between and arguments and non-arguments (explanations, descriptions, and reports).
3. Students identify the conclusion of an argument.
4. Students identify and evaluate the support for the conclusion.
5. Students recognize the context and purpose of an argument.
6. Students produce written work that follows Standard English and documentation.

 

PHIL 104 - Philosophy of Cultural Diversity: Challenge and Change


1. Students demonstrate an understanding and appreciation about what philosophy of cultural diversity is by: a) exhibiting basic comprehension in the areas of mythic consciousness, cultural relativism, ethnocentrism, cultural diversity, the universal moral community, human rights, citizenship, global justice, and worldviews; and, b) displaying an awareness of social conditions and challenges as they are viewed from the perspective of others who are culturally different from the student.
2. Students differentiate between cultural relativism and universal moral values. 
3. Students understand and engage in the practice of philosophical inquiry relevant to global cultural issues. 
4. Students demonstrate basic understanding of philosophical concepts, philosophers, and their contributions to world philosophy. 
5. Students comprehend and analyze Eastern and Western philosophical texts, recognize philosophical claims, and assess the merit of the evidence. 

 

PHIL 105 - Philosophy of Art and Beauty

1. Students apply at least two aesthetic theories (one classical and one modern) to a work of art, novel, a collection of poetry, a play, a collection of paintings, a CD or musical performance, or a movie, in order to demonstrate an appreciation and understanding for the philosophic al activity and theory of aesthetics and philosophy of art. 
2. Students demonstrate an understanding of basic concepts and methods of aesthetics and philosophy of art.
3. Students define and competently use philosophical terminology in discussions of aesthetics and philosophy of art.
4. Students define major movements of aesthetics and philosophy of art in the history of philosophy. 
5. Students apply different aesthetic theories to specific artistic expressions and styles.
6. Students demonstrate an understanding of course material by expressing oneself cogently and reflectively on the issues of beauty, art, and philosophy.

 

PHIL 106 - Introduction to Logic

1. Students demonstrate proficiency in critical thinking and understanding of deductive and inductive reasoning and competence in the basic analytical methods of logic.
2. Students identify non-argumentative passages such as explanation, illustration, conditional statements, reports, and unsupported assertions.
3. Students translate English arguments into symbolic form.
4. Students identify and assess the validity (and invalidity) of deductive arguments (by means of Venn diagrams and truth tables) and the strength (and weakness) of inductive arguments.
5. Students identify informal and formal fallacies. 
6. Students apply rules of inference and equivalence in proving the validity of deductive arguments.

 

PHIL 107 - Philosophy of Science and Technology

1. Students compare and contrast at least two different theories of the philosophy of science and technology.
2. Students use the vocabulary of the philosophy of science and technology.
3. Students discuss at least two contemporary ethical, political, or cultural issues relevant to the philosophy of science and technology.
4. Students think critically about at least two ethical, epistemological, methodological, ontological, or religious questions that arise in the philosophy of science and technology.
5. Students compare and contrast deductive and inductive forms of scientific reasoning.
6. Students defend positions in a debate between scientific realist and anti-realists and subject them to critical analysis.

 

PHIL 108 - Philosophy of the Americas

1. Students explain at least one aspect of the branches of philosophy (metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, aesthetics, and political and social philosophy) in each of the four cultural worldviews: African-American Philosophy, Latin-American Philosophy, Native-American Philosophy, and Anglo-American philosophy. 
2. Students demonstrate a basic understanding of methods of philosophy.
3. Students compare and contrast theories in metaphysics, epistemology, aesthetics, and ethics relevant to the four worldviews examined in the course.
4. Students assess similarities and divergence among the four worldviews in the areas of economic justice, environment, and religious practices (influences of African, Indigenous Religions, and Christianity) and subject them to critical analysis.
5. Students think critically about at least two ontological, epistemological, methodological, ethical, or religious questions that arise from the four worldview systems.

 

PHILOSOPHY 109 - PHILOSOPHY OF THE BODY, FEMINISM, AND GENDER

1. Students explain traditional and non-canonical arguments in support of or against the ontology of body, feminism, and gender.
2. Students provide examples of theories on gender identity, the nature of the self and personal identity, friendship, and personal relationships.
3. Students explain traditional and non-traditional theories of feminist conceptions of knowledge, philosophy of language, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of science.
4. Students compare and contrast male responses to contemporary moral, social, and political feminist theories. 
5. Students relate feminist questions about beauty and art to the traditional and non-traditional canons of theories of the body, feminism, and gender.

 

PHILOSOPHY 130 – History of Ancient Philosophy

  1. Students list and define key thinkers of Ancient philosophy.
  2. Students understand the role of interpretation of texts in deciding the position and key concepts, theories, and arguments of individual Ancient philosophers.
  3. Students compare and contrast the main contributions and ideas of philosophers in the Ancient period.
  4. Students know the difference between the Pre-Socratics, the Sophists, and the great systems of Plato and Aristotle.
  5. Students write good philosophical essays which reveal improved skill in the presentation and defense of arguments, especially as they relate to the study of Ancient philosophy.
  6. Students understand the impossibility of knowing how the modern world was formed, unless one has studied the power and influence of the Ancient philosophers on religion, politics, law, science, history, and literature.

 PHILOSOPHY 140 – History of Modern Philosophy

               

  1. Students define and competently use philosophical terminology in discussions of philosophy.
  2. Students demonstrate critical philosophical kills to present accurately and to interpret positions of seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers, based on readings of their primary texts.
  3. Students critically analyze, evaluate, and compare and contrast major arguments, assumptions, principles, styles, and methods of seventeenth and eighteenth century philosophers.
  4. Students explain philosophical arguments, methods, background assumptions, and principles about the nature of reality, God, the self, the sources and limits of human knowledge, and freedom.
  5. Students understand and appreciate the emergence of modern philosophical thinking about the human mind (the relationship between reason and the emotions) and politics (social contract theories).

 

 

PHILOSOPHY 160 – Symbolic Logic

 

1. Students demonstrate ability to assess whether an argument is valid or invalid, based on its underlying logical form.
2. Students recognize the logical form of sentences in English.
3. Students translate English arguments into symbolic form.
4. Students demonstrate validity by means of Venn diagrams and truth tables.
5. Students demonstrate competence in the basic analytical method of formal logic by applying rules to prove validity in sentential logic by means of implicational rules, equivalence rules, conditional proof, and reduction ad absurdum proof.
6. Students apply inference rules for predicate logic, Universal Instantiation, Existential Instantiation, Existential Generalization, and Universal Generalization.
7. Students demonstrate truth-tree techniques for evaluating arguments.
8. Students explain some of the philosophical problems relevant to symbolic logic.

 

PHIL 200 - World Religions

1. Students identify the major religious traditions of the world and their principal teachings on ethics and metaphysics. 
2. Students identify founders, scriptures, and key philosophers in the world's major religions. 
3. Students analyze the ethical and spiritual teachings and practices. 
4. Students compare and contrast religions with regard to their sacred writings, rituals, and beliefs.
5. Students analyze philosophical and religious ideas amongst religions, including their concepts of nature, ultimate reality, cosmology, and ethics.

 

PHIL 201 - Contemporary Philosophy

1. Students understand, explain, and assess at least three major philosophical movements that characterize the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including the rise of Continental, Asian, African, Anglo-American, Feminist, Latin-American, and Marxist philosophies.
2. Students explain successfully at least three of the following concepts examined by the above philosophical movements: self and subjectivity; mind and consciousness; alienation, anxiety, and authenticity, freedom and determinism, gender, race, nationality, and social justice.
3. Students recognize and explain the role of language, meaning, and truth in philosophical inquiry.
4. Students develop a philosophical analysis of a contemporary cultural, political, religious, or scientific problem.
5. Students distinguish between 'analytic' and 'continental' approaches to doing philosophy.

 

PHIL 203- Philosophy of Religion

1. Students compare and contrast Western and non-Western approaches to religion and religious experience.
2. Students understand the use the vocabulary of the philosophy of religion.
3. Students explain critically the concepts of God, creation, miracles, faith, salvation, etc. and assess at least two arguments for the existence of God and two arguments against the existence of God.
4. Students think critically about sacred texts and their interpretation.
5. Students examine the relationship between science and religion.

 

PHIL 204 - Philosophy of the Bible I (Hebrew Scripture)

1. Students understand and critically appreciate the different methods of interpretation (historical, literary, cultural, and philosophical) of the Hebrew Scriptures.
2. Students trace the emergence of monotheism in ancient Israel and its relevance for contemporary Western culture.
3. Students explain the concept of covenant in the faith of ancient Israel. 
4. Students describe the role and function of the prophet in ancient Israel.
5. Students provide examples from archeology to corroborate the Bible as history. 
6. Students identify and illustrate the three parts of the Hebrew Scripture or TANAK (the Torah, Prophets, and Writings).

 

PHIL 205 - Introduction to Bioethics

1. Students compare and contrast at least two different aspects of issues examined in bioethics with respect to ethics (applied and meta-ethics), epistemology, and metaphysics. 
2. Students use effectively the vocabulary of the bioethics.
3. Students critically discuss and produce possible resolutions of at least two current issues relevant to bioethics.
4. Students think critically about at least two ontological, epistemological, methodological, ethical, or religious questions that arise in bioethics.

 

PHIL 206 - Philosophy of the Bible II (Christian Scriptures)


1. Students understand and critically appreciate the different methods of interpretation (historical, literary, cultural, and philosophical) of the Christian scriptures. 
2. Students explain and evaluate the significance of the quest for the historical Jesus.
3. Students explain the significance of "Q" in the New Testament studies.
4. Students discuss and evaluate the development of the New Testament Canon. 
5. Students explain how the early church was viewed by the Roman government. 
6. Students evaluate the reasons why some first-century Jews accepted Jesus as the Messiah and some rejected him.
7. Students understand and illustrate the four different portraits of Jesus in the canonical Gospels.

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Last Update: 7/16/2019